Abercrombie & Fitch CEO Mike Jeffries apparently thinks ugly and overweight people are not “cool enough” to wear his products. In a 2006 interview with Salon, Jeffries was quoted as saying: “In every school there are the cool and popular kids, and then there are the not-so-cool kids. Candidly, we go after the cool kids….A lot of people don’t belong [in our clothes], and they can’t belong. Are we exclusionary? Absolutely.” Jeffries comments recently resurfaced in interviews following the publication of the book “The New Rules of Retail,” and went viral after critics formed online protests. Amanda Brea, 16, doesn’t agree with the policy but believes Jeffries has the right to voice his own opinion. “It’s his business so he can do whatever he wants with it,” says Brea, who goes to the John D. O’Bryant School of Math & Science. “I feel that’s unfair. But it’s not my company…He will lose a lot of money and customers because not everyone is skinny or pretty.” In a Facebook post from the Abercrombie & Fitch page, Jeffries attempted to make amends but stopped short of an apology. “I sincerely regret that my choice of words was interpreted in a manner that has caused offense,” he wrote. “A&F is an aspirational brand that, like most specialty apparel brands, targets its marketing at a particular segment of customers. However, we care about the broader communities in which we operate and are strongly committed to diversity and inclusion.” News reports earlier this year said that Jeffries had been stripped of his chairman role at the company. On a recent trip to Abercrombie & Fitch, Teens in Print brought along a 15-year-old girl who wears sizes four to six when shopping for pants. At A&F, she couldn’t pull the size six pants over her thighs. When the 15-year-old asked if they carried any “curvy” pants, the clerk replied that the store only had “skinny to super-skinny.” Nancy Aleid, 17, thinks Abercrombie & Fitch’s sizing system is dangerous. “This is promoting anorexia in a way by making young people feel as if their weight and size isn’t embraced by society,” says Aleid, who goes to the O’Bryant. Tia Knowles, 17, from Snowden International High School, feels that Abercrombie & Fitch is sexist and unfair. “Self-image,” says Knowles, “comes in different shapes and sizes.”  
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Concerts have evolved over the years, some expanding in size and extravagance. These shows can put teens at risk.

In June, electronic artist Avicii held a performance at TD Garden in which dozens of people had to be treated after ingesting drugs or alcohol. According to the Boston Globe, those hospitalized included minors under the influence. One concertgoer, David Lopera, saw intoxicated people but just enjoyed what he came for. “The concert itself was great,” said Lopera, 17, who goes to the John D. O’Bryant School of Math & Science. Still, Lopera advised that worried teens should go to shows with friends in case things get out of hand. Haiyang Xu, 16, of Boston Latin School, said that shows were meant to be untamed -- but not to the point of injury. “I understand people want to go hard during these events but overdoing it kills the vibe,” said Xu. Xu said he would go to future shows knowing the risks but feels that venues need to own up to who they allow through entrance gates. “Instead of complaining about problems, they can fi  it themselves and take charge,” said Xu. Kassandra Boada, 17, from the O’Bryant, said she has no problem attending these popular performances but understands that they can get wild. Accountability, she said, does not fall entirely on the venue but also with the spectators themselves. “You should be held responsible for your own actions,” she said, “and it’s stupid to ruin it for everyone else.”
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Curfews have been all over the news, from Ferguson, Missouri, in the wake of the fatal shooting of unarmed black 18-year-old Michael Brown, to the city of Lowell, Massachusetts, where city councilors want stricter enforcement of time restrictions. “Teen curfews are set and given to assure the safety of the adolescents,” says Jacky Hang, 17, from Boston Commun Leadership Academy. Jason Cuervas, 18, believes curfews are OK for some areas of Boston. “Curfews should only be enforced in the rough parts of the city,” says Cuervas, who goes to school in East Boston. Fifteen-year-old Katlyne Davis, from Mattapan, already has early evening curfews on weekdays and weekends – but she says she ignores them. “Most times, no, not even most times, all the time, I never follow it,” Davis says. Lowell is trying to crack down on those under 17 who are out after 11 pm. Says Lissa Seiti, 16, from Lowell Catholic High School: “I guess I would have to get arrested then.”
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I am a 17-year-old Haitian-American. One thing I have learned in my short time on this earth is that people have their own perspectives on how they see the world. On January 12, 2010, a devastating event occurred. I was home with my siblings when a family friend gave us the news that an earthquake had struck Haiti. Over 200, 000 people were declared dead. It was by far the toughest thing I’ve had to comprehend. This changed my life and my view of the world forever. At that time, I didn’t have a worry in the world outside of school, but now I know the importance of family, culture, and most of all, God. Because of that day, I have grown a lot because I realized that humans in general are all the same, whether poor, rich, black, white. That day, people from all races, age groups, and religions lost their lives -- but also came together for the people of Haiti. This has affected me both negatively and positively. It left an open wound that will always be a part of me. It was like the end of the world. So many people I knew passed away. The buildings collapsed onto adults, kids, and animals with no mercy. But it also showed me how precious life truly is. We each have to make our mark on this world, and my goal is to spread peace and happiness every place I go. My motto is: Love is for now, not for tomorrow.
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Caitlyn Undag, 15, from the John D. O’Bryant School of Math & Science, rides public transportation daily and does not like the recent rise in MBTA fares. “It was already high enough,” she says during the summer. “Teens and adults are already struggling to earn money and raising the prices won’t help them.” On July 1, fares rose by 10 cents, to $1.60 for buses and $2.10 for subways. In the summer, teens free school day passes stopped working – as they will on weekends when school resumes and fares are half price. Teens might have to retreat from certain activities as they did in summer. Undag says the transport costs stopped her from going to her usual tea-house destinations this summer. Coliea Turner, 16, from the O’Bryant, rode the T often this summer and says a lot of her money went toward fees. “By the end of the week, I am broke,” Turner says. Turner says she did not go to the downtown movie theatre like she used to. “Due to the bus fares, it’s taking away my money from buying the movie ticket itself,” Turner says. Kianah Moss, 15, meanwhile, thinks that the T prices are reasonable. “They only raised the prices by 10 cents,” says Moss, who goes to the O’Bryant. “So if I could pay $2 for the train, I could pay $2.10.”
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