Although it’s not usually portrayed that way, 16-year-old Kadidiatou Bah, from Dorchester, thinks swag and class -- two current states of style -- have more similarities than the average teen might think.

After all, it may not be so much about what you wear as how you wear it. For example, where you would tuck your shirt in for class, you take it out for swag. Dressing classy or with swag depends on your personality. Michael Miller, 18, of Roxbury, considers himself more of a dressy dresser. “When you think of swag you think of informal clothing,” he says, “but class is more formal wear.” Miller adds: “I can honestly say I only have, like, two pairs of sneakers in my closet.” Josiah Huggins, 19, of Dorchester, is more about swag. “I’ve only dressed classy three times in my entire life,” he says. “My swag consists of some fresh J’s, a nice shirt, some dip jeans, and a snapback to match.” He adds, “Oh yeah, don’t forget my Gucci belt.”
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Seventeen-year-old Amal Egal believes that if someone is truly her friend, that person would not betray her. However, if she was subject to harm, she would understand. “I have snitched on someone before because I thought it would be the best thing for them at the time,” says Egal, who goes to the John D. O’Bryant School of Math & Science. “It is important to note that as a friend you should understand that your friends’ health and happiness holds immense significance.” Sometimes, whether to snitch on someone or not can be a huge dilemma. Both your promise to say nothing -- and your decision to tell all -- could be a dangerous thing. “Being a good friend means that you would do what you think is best for them, even though they might end up hating on you,” says Zusex Romero, 18, from Roxbury. Mu Xian Chen, 18, has felt the sting of being sold down the river. “I felt disappointed,” says Chen, from the O’Bryant, “when I found out that the friend that I would trust the most would snitch on me.”
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A mother looks into her daughter’s eyes and sees she no longer has that connection. Someone else has filled her nights with closeness, trust, love, and intimacy. Someone else has come into her life. The daughter now has this battle between trying to weigh out what should occupy her more: her school work or trying to figure out if her relationship will end tonight or maybe after her big math test. Love is a feeling that obtains your life in one swallow. Love is when you go through hell and back, and still manage to hold it together. Love can often hurt. Sixteen-year-old Shatara Wimes, of Dorchester, knows that love may not last forever, but when it grabs hold of you, you would do anything for that person. “Love to me is a deep affection and a passionate feeling towards another person -- whether you guys are in a relationship or not,” says Wimes. “No matter how many wrongs or rights the person has done, you can still want them in your life, even if they are just a friend.” When Nya Ross was 10, she thought love was gross. As she grew older, she explored life and has been in relationships where she has ended up making lifelong friends. Love to her is a new experience each time. “You can fall in love more than once,” says Ross, now 17, of Dorchester. “It’s not a one- time thing.” Deion Ducoste, 17, of Dorchester, believes that you truly know love when you go with the fl w. “You learn to love when you learn to live,” says Ducoste. “When you learn to enjoy your life to the fullest, you learn to love every aspect of life.”
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Grace Villafane, 17, from Boston Community Leadership Academy, says she doesn’t like Boston because it’s boring. “It’s the same thing, there’s nothing new,” she says. Villafane visits places that she is already familiar with, and with people she knows. She wants to live in LA because she believes it’s more exciting. Shanelis Pena, 17, from Madison Park High School, says that she has been in Boston for way too long and does not like it. “Everywhere you go it’s either bad or you can’t go there,” says Pena, who feels it is too dangerous to travel around certain parts of the city due to gang-related violence. Pena says she would rather be in New York because she thinks it has more entertainment and she can get around with no questions asked. Genesis Seda, a sophomore at the John D. O’Bryant School of Math & Science, isn’t much of a fan of Boston, either. “Boston is alright,” says Seda. “It’s not the best or the worst.” Seda says she would very much like to be in New York because there is more variety than in Boston. She also likes the fashion in New York more than that of Boston, and thinks she’d have more success being her own person in New York because she feels that in Boston everyone copies each other
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Gulbahar Ozseferoglu, 18, from Another Course to College, thinks that young girls who want thigh gaps are ridiculous.

“Having a thigh gap isn’t going to make you more attractive or do anything for your self esteem, it’s just going to make you feel like you are a part of the trend,” says Ozseferoglu. “I would never try to get a thigh gap because I think it’s weird and disgusting.” Thigh gaps are a large space between your legs when standing with feet together. Women are furiously working out or undergoing surgery to achieve the sought-after “thigh-gap” look. But many teens say that striving for thigh gaps is a problem because they attract the wrong attention. Glendy Carrasquillo, 17, from ACC, is not one of those girls obsessed with that body effect. “No I wouldn’t get one,” says Carrasquillo. “I didn’t know it was possible.” Kievaughna Copeland, 18, from Dorchester, has a natural thigh gap but isn’t fond of the body-shape movement. “Girls need to accept themselves for who they are,” she says, “and stop trying to become everybody else.”
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