Even with overwhelming evidence against him — including his own reported zealous admissions — some teens are still not convinced that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is guilty of the Boston Marathon bombings that left three dead and more than 260 injured. His older brother and alleged co-conspirator, Tamerlan, 26, was killed in the aftermath that resulted in the capture of Dzhokhar, a/k/a Jahar. Tayla Spencer, 19, from Dorchester, still doesn’t think the evidence is solid. “How did they know that it was them?” Spencer asks. “Do they have video footage of them planning and acting-out the whole thing?” In this high-tech age of instant street surveillance snapshots, some teens are demanding visual lockdown proof before they are ready to take somebody’s word about things. As one Twitter user using the hashtag “freejahar” wrote: “da lack of evidence they hve mkes me angry bc they r meant to be pros @ investigations but no they investigate like 2 yr olds smh.” In addition, there is a set of young females who believe that Dzhokhar -- 19 years old at the time of the bombings – is simply too goodlooking to have committed such a ruthless act. La`Neece Byrd, a senior at Boston Community Leadership Academy, is not among them. “He’s a terrorizer,” says Byrd. “He wanted to see Boston suffer. But something good came out of it. The citizens of Boston were able to unite as one and stay strong.”
Read more…
Kevin Rodriguez, 17, who attends Boston Latin School, believes that older folks are very important for society, that they are filled with wisdom, and that they also keep traditions alive. “I have seen myself in my grandparents because we have some similar ways of doing things,” says Rodriguez. “There are many things we young people can do to help them, but I think the most important one is just spending time with them.” Often, some teens say, what elders want is just someone to talk to. So being an audience to their life stories is a great way for teens to show their appreciation. Other youth, however, simply can’t be bothered. They see the older generation as burdens who, for example, walk too slowly and clog up the supermarket aisles. Bonnie Ramos, 19, strongly disagrees. She says she has a great relationship with her grandparents, especially the grandmother who gives her advice. “I think elders should be respected and it is good to give them help in any way because they might not be as capable as a younger person to get what they need,” says Ramos, who lives in East Boston. Juan Lopera, 17, appreciates the history and knowledge in those who came before him. “Old people for me are great people because they are our ancestors,” says Lopera, from Boston Community Leadership Academy. “They have been through life in more difficult situations than us. They have become more wise.”
Read more…
Relationships
Flirtationship = More than friends, less than a relationship
Often, at least one teen in this state has an emotional or physical interest in the friend, but each still maintains an undefined role in the other’s life. It’s a complicated link. You’re not really with the other, but you flirt a lot. It can remain harmless or it can lead to a relationship. It starts off really simple, light, easy, fun, and uncomplicated. But as soon as one person has more feelings than the other, or moves into a relationship with someone else, all the rules change and someone can get hurt. Say you meet a new, cute guy and he asks you out. If the guy you’re in a flirtationship with had feelings for you, this could cause jealousy between you two. In the end, whether it’s a friendship, relationship, or even a flirtationship, jealousy is the number one cause of break-ups out there.
Read more…
Zhane’a Williams, 17, describes a fake Louis Vuitton handbag. “It feels like plastic. Cheap material,” says Williams, from Dorchester. Real: Sharp and clear. Soft. If it’s stiff? Toss it! Funky stitching? You already lost it. Lower than seven hunna — 700 dollars? Not real! Dust bag — which the LV comes in — isn’t high quality? It’s a dust rag. Many teens are influenced by the material things they wear. “Status,” says Williams. “It shows or makes it seem like you have money and are well-off compared to others around you.” You won’t find teens in big box discount stores looking for something real to get their status up. It’ll only bring them down. “I think a name-brand bag will last longer,” says Nijkah Morris, now 20, from Dorchester. “It’s durable, and overall a better investment rather than buying a bunch of normal bags every couple months when they fall apart.” Morris says she would like a real one but, for now, has to settle for the imitation knockoff that can be had for $45. Tatianna Marie, 19, from Dorchester, goes for a pretty bag, real or fake. “Honestly, it really doesn’t matter as long as the bag’s cute,” says Marie. “I’ll take it name brand or not.”
Read more…
For a movie star, Matt Damon has a very down-to-earth entry on his bucket list. “If I had a bucket list, I’d say raising my four girls to be strong, good women would be number one,” Damon was quoted as saying in Parade magazine. It may be surprising to hear that celebrities have their own bucket lists, since they seem to get whatever they want on a regular basis. However, child star Lil’ Romeo — who now goes by the more grown-up name “Romeo” — was quoted on SI.com as saying that going to the Super Bowl was on his bucket list. He explained that he was too busy with school and other things to attend. As for me, my bucket list is filled with adventure. Before I die, I would like to go diving -- skydiving, cliff diving, and scuba diving.
Read more…