Sixteen-year-old Judy Zhao watched the movie “The Hunger Games” and is excited about the sequel, “Catching Fire,” due out in November. “I think that the second part…is going to be better, since I already read the book,” says Zhao, who attends the John D. O’Bryant School of Math & Science. Zhao expects lots of action, including the main character, Katniss, entering the Hunger Games again. Cyrus Kohistani, 17, from the O’Bryant, thinks that the second part is not going to be as good as the first since the same ideas are going to be developed. “I watched ‘The Hangover’ 1 and 2,” says Kohistani, “but the second one was not as good as the first one.” As described in previews, the second installment’s plot revolves around Katniss leaving friends and family to launch a Victory Tour. Kripa Thapa, 16, from West Roxbury Academy, believes the November film will live up to its hype.
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Ever since there was such a thing as music, it has always contained one or both components. That’s right -- a beat and lyrics to go along with it. Have you ever stopped to consider which of the two is more important? “Lyrics are more important because they affect me on an emotional level,” says 17-yearold Massa Dukuly-Bah, from the John D. O’Bryant School of Math & Science. “If you took out the beat I would still listen because the lyrics make the song poetic.” It is true that minus lyrics it would be very difficult to comprehend what the artist had in mind, says Boston Latin Academy sophomore Janaya Hewitt. “Without lyrics,” Hewitt says, “there is no song.” Beats have a strong advocate behind them in Alex Lei, a junior from the O’Bryant. “So many songs would not be as popular as they are if they did not have a nice beat,” says Lei. “I mean, that’s what makes me want to listen to a song multiple times.” Although they take different stances in the words vs. rhythm debate, these teens agree on one thing: “You can’t have one without the other,” says Hewitt. “The beat has to suit the lyrics and vice versa,” says Dukuly-Bah. “They complement each other.” Dubstep and techno aside, not much of modern music separate beats and lyrics and most artists try not to treat them as separate parts but compound them to make a whole they call…music.
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When you’re down, spending time on the North Washington Street Bridge that links the North End to Charlestown is the best. The sound of water calms your brain. Then, the rumble of the cars speeding by brings you back to reality. Sitting on the ledge near City Hall in Government Center is relaxing. Especially on the weekends, Government Center is full of people and activities like singing or dancing. Looking down, you can see how beautiful Boston is. One minute, the streets will be filled with people and happiness. The next, everything will be quiet and peaceful. These big structures build a wall around you, and protect you. When you’re upset at night and don’t feel like talking to anyone, you head for the soccer field near the high school in Charlestown. You can kick your soccer ball against the wall and nobody will care. That’s the best way to get your anger out. No one gets hurt. The smell of rain makes you feel alive. Most people hate it so it’s just you standing there -- anywhere -- and it’s like you are in the middle of the ocean, swimming by yourself. Nobody is around to say anything. Nobody is there to judge you. You are so free and sometimes you just scream because it makes you feel better. In the day, the North End is so busy. Nobody has time for anybody. Everybody’s just running around. In the middle of this city rush, you can find your own quiet zone and reflect upon life. End of the day. Work is done. No more phone calls. No more customers. Waiting for the bus home outside Haymarket is a good place to chill and think. The moon seems to follow you and look out for you. It’s alone time.
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Losangela Batista, 17, from the John D. O’Bryant School of Math & Science, believes that people should start dating when they feel like they are mature enough to be responsible for their actions. When is a good age? Many parents have strict rules about their kids dating. For example, some teens are not allowed to date until they are at least 18, when there are fewer distractions and more in common with someone else. “I’m not sure if I would put a dating age for my child,” says Ben Perez, a 15-year-old Boston resident. Angie Miranda, 17, of the O’Bryant, thinks that parents should talk to their kids about dating and see if they are ready. When Batista becomes a mother in the future, she says she would allow her children to date during high school so they can have fun. However, when she becomes a parent, Batista will talk to her children about what to do and what not to do in a relationship.
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2013 Summer Journalism Institute
Boston University teaches TiPsters dance and movement
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