In Haiti, I always had to fight to succeed. In my culture, people look at you at a different angle if you are not educated. But how can a young soul succeed when it can be who you know, not what you know? My parents and I made the decision to come to America. When I came to the United States, four years after the devastating earthquake of 2010, I felt lost. I had to rebuild my life from scratch. However, I had come to a place of acceptance and made the decision to press forward. I had to learn the meaning of perseverance. In America, education is different. It is not based on memorization but on comprehension. But more resources are available here. Teachers make you understand. No more hours of trying to remember several pages. No more fears of not having a better future. I want to be a businesswoman and also start an organization that helps students in Haiti. I am determined to obtain success no matter how long it takes.
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My dream is to go to Panama. Why Panama? I’ve wanted to go to Panama ever since I saw the FOX TV series, “Prison Break,” which had episodes set in that Central American country. The fact that Panama is neither in the news a lot nor is it in people’s daily conversations makes me want to go even more. When I arrive in Panama, the first thing I’m going to do is check-in to the Panama Golf & Beach Resort so that I can just settle my things and immediately go off and view the sites. From my research, I know that Panama can be a busy environment so I would have to get used to being in an intense setting. Also, I might need to learn how to swim, climb tropical trees, and speak Spanish. Later, I want to go see the sloths, eat mango, shop in the street markets, walk on the trails, meet indigenous Panamanians, and finally, slurp cashews straight from the shells. My trip to Panama will not only make me the semi-most-happiest person of my generation, but it will also give me bragging rights. The idea is to stay there for about a week and come back to America rejuvenated and ready to plan my next trip -- to Colombia.
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The death penalty is legal in 31 states and the federal system for aggravated crimes. Locally,this heated issue came into sharp focus in May, when convicted Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was sentenced to die. On the following pages,students passionately debate the pros and cons of capital punishment.
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In the world of superheroes, there is much debate about which champion is best. For Ralph Lambert, 14, it is the Incredible Hulk. “All Hulk has to do is get mad and beat everyone to a pulp,” says Lambert, from Hyde Park. Fourteen-year-old James Anderson, from Dorchester, is a Superman fan. “This dude even has a lair in the Arctic and doesn't freeze up,” Anderson says. Meanwhile, 15-year-old Brooklyn Crowe has another superhero in mind. “Batman would win,” says Crowe, from Dorchester, “because he has all the technology to do it.”
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I really don’t know why my mom can’t just let me do some stuff on my own because I’m 18. In my mom’s mind, I’m still a baby. A teenager is often on the phone talking with friends or listening to music. I need to be calm and focused before I do my homework. My mother thinks I’m acting like a child. But I am 18 -- not 8 years old. I have to make my own choices to learn the difference between good and bad. I know my mom wants to protect me from trouble but she has to know I’m not a kid anymore. I have to experience things to be prepared for life. She should be proud of me. I could be a drug addict or in prison, but I’m not. As this girl’s mother, I want to keep her out of trouble. I don’t know what kind of friends she has, but the street is really dangerous. I know she’s 18 but sometimes I think she’s my 8-year-old baby. She gives her phone the most important place in her life -- more than studying. I know she always thinks I’m on her, but I just want to protect her and help her to have a better life. To realize her dreams because for a mother that’s the big thing.
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