College is one of the top choices that students make after finishing high school, but not all students are being properly prepared to face the challenges of higher education. Many schools are too busy getting them ready for standardized tests to have time to pass along actual knowledge. Data released last year by the College Board revealed that only 43 percent of those in the class of 2013 who took the SATs graduated from high school ready for the rigors of college academics. According to educational experts, students need to develop reasoning strategies, the ability to work independently, and time management skills to better succeed. One strategy educators would like to see is the expanded use of tougher coursework. According to the College Board, more than 300,000 students in the graduating class of 2012 who were identified as having the potential to do well in an Advanced Placement course did not actually take one.
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My wish list Screen Shot 2014-06-04 at 11.43.34 AMA word of advice: You have made it through another year of high school. Congrats! This does not mean to slack off, because you will be sorry later. With my words of encouragement, I hope you will make the right choices. Here is a list I wish I had followed: 1. Do not value first impressions highly. Do not judge someone without getting to know him or her. 2. Stay as far away as possible from DRAMA. If the problem does not involve you, do not get involved. 3. Get your driver’s license. Get your permit ASAP and start practicing. 4. Do not try to please everybody. B e true to who you are because it is impossible to make everyone happy. 5. Play sports and volunteer. S taying active is the way to go. Volunteering helps the community and looks good on your college application. 6. Stay on top of your work. Always remember that your academics can take you a long way. 7. Be yourself. Do not change to fit in with the crowd. 8. Take responsibility. Before you point fingers, check yourself. 9. Have fun -- but not too much fun. Stay in school!
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Gunther von Hagens’ Body Worlds: Vital exhibit showcases the human body with an artistic and scientific focus. Walk into the show and you are met by a series of real, preserved human bodies -- mostly male. Where are the females, you may ask, in this Faneuil Hall exhibit? This lack of female bodies deprives girls of something -- the experience to learn more about themselves. According to the exhibit’s guide, von Hagens did not want to seem voyeuristic in revealing too many female bodies. However, educating girls and boys about the female anatomy is essential to an equitable society.   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xp7STR7QWsw
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As girls, it is very challenging to have to admit that our self-esteem is not as high as we might pretend it is in front of others. We have an image as girls to protect because there are things that boys can do but that society says are unacceptable for us. Our way of handling pressure is different, which is why as teens all the drama starts to come into our lives. Don’t forget, we grew up as being the princess of the family, or daddy’s little girl, and that status has changed. For some girls, the stress of fitting in can become so much that they can turn depressed and don’t even want to go to school. Parents should start helping their daughters to believe more in themselves.
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Screen Shot 2014-06-04 at 11.33.20 AMThe famous game Flappy Bird became popular more quickly than the experts expected. It has a simple object: to direct a flying bird between sets of pipes without touching them. Though the game was supposed to provide relaxation, its Vietnamese creator Dong Nguyen said he was so upset at its addictive nature that earlier this year he pulled it from circulation, according to news accounts. Nguyen wanted teens to play for a few minutes not waste long hours that are important to them, so he took it away. (“Let Me Tell You About That Time I Played ‘Flappy Bird’ For 8 Hours” is what one headline said.) Already, though, copycat games have appeared to take its place.
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