Gunther von Hagens’ Body Worlds: Vital exhibit showcases the human body with an artistic and scientific focus. Walk into the show and you are met by a series of real, preserved human bodies -- mostly male. Where are the females, you may ask, in this Faneuil Hall exhibit? This lack of female bodies deprives girls of something -- the experience to learn more about themselves. According to the exhibit’s guide, von Hagens did not want to seem voyeuristic in revealing too many female bodies. However, educating girls and boys about the female anatomy is essential to an equitable society.   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xp7STR7QWsw
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As girls, it is very challenging to have to admit that our self-esteem is not as high as we might pretend it is in front of others. We have an image as girls to protect because there are things that boys can do but that society says are unacceptable for us. Our way of handling pressure is different, which is why as teens all the drama starts to come into our lives. Don’t forget, we grew up as being the princess of the family, or daddy’s little girl, and that status has changed. For some girls, the stress of fitting in can become so much that they can turn depressed and don’t even want to go to school. Parents should start helping their daughters to believe more in themselves.
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Screen Shot 2014-06-04 at 11.33.20 AMThe famous game Flappy Bird became popular more quickly than the experts expected. It has a simple object: to direct a flying bird between sets of pipes without touching them. Though the game was supposed to provide relaxation, its Vietnamese creator Dong Nguyen said he was so upset at its addictive nature that earlier this year he pulled it from circulation, according to news accounts. Nguyen wanted teens to play for a few minutes not waste long hours that are important to them, so he took it away. (“Let Me Tell You About That Time I Played ‘Flappy Bird’ For 8 Hours” is what one headline said.) Already, though, copycat games have appeared to take its place.
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“Dang, I’m so fat. I jiggle and have rolls.” So many people in this world have low self-esteem when they shouldn’t. Having high self-esteem is feeling confident in yourself. It’s a positive image and that is healthy for you. Having low self-esteem is depressing. You only think negative things, and when people see you they don’t want to be around you. Many teens worry more about making others feel good than about themselves. I suffer from this. I tell them all the good things about themselves, but I can’t do this for myself. I always try to find my flaws. When I do feel good about myself, it’s the best feeling. People need to surround themselves with those who will push them into doing things that are good for them -- like going to the gym instead of laying in bed eating chips and watching Netflix. Making changes little by little can help you. Maybe watching TV for three hours a day rather than five; only eating in the kitchen, not in bed. Doing something is way better than doing nothing.
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Abercrombie & Fitch CEO Mike Jeffries apparently thinks ugly and overweight people are not “cool enough” to wear his products. In a 2006 interview with Salon, Jeffries was quoted as saying: “In every school there are the cool and popular kids, and then there are the not-so-cool kids. Candidly, we go after the cool kids….A lot of people don’t belong [in our clothes], and they can’t belong. Are we exclusionary? Absolutely.” Jeffries comments recently resurfaced in interviews following the publication of the book “The New Rules of Retail,” and went viral after critics formed online protests. Amanda Brea, 16, doesn’t agree with the policy but believes Jeffries has the right to voice his own opinion. “It’s his business so he can do whatever he wants with it,” says Brea, who goes to the John D. O’Bryant School of Math & Science. “I feel that’s unfair. But it’s not my company…He will lose a lot of money and customers because not everyone is skinny or pretty.” In a Facebook post from the Abercrombie & Fitch page, Jeffries attempted to make amends but stopped short of an apology. “I sincerely regret that my choice of words was interpreted in a manner that has caused offense,” he wrote. “A&F is an aspirational brand that, like most specialty apparel brands, targets its marketing at a particular segment of customers. However, we care about the broader communities in which we operate and are strongly committed to diversity and inclusion.” News reports earlier this year said that Jeffries had been stripped of his chairman role at the company. On a recent trip to Abercrombie & Fitch, Teens in Print brought along a 15-year-old girl who wears sizes four to six when shopping for pants. At A&F, she couldn’t pull the size six pants over her thighs. When the 15-year-old asked if they carried any “curvy” pants, the clerk replied that the store only had “skinny to super-skinny.” Nancy Aleid, 17, thinks Abercrombie & Fitch’s sizing system is dangerous. “This is promoting anorexia in a way by making young people feel as if their weight and size isn’t embraced by society,” says Aleid, who goes to the O’Bryant. Tia Knowles, 17, from Snowden International High School, feels that Abercrombie & Fitch is sexist and unfair. “Self-image,” says Knowles, “comes in different shapes and sizes.”  
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