The Downside of Starting School Later   School is something essential for every kid, but does that mean they shouldn’t have enough sleep? Sleep gives us the ability to concentrate in school and helps our memory and ability to learn. Lack of sleep can cause drowsiness -- a detriment both inside and outside of school. But because many teens end up arriving late to school -- either due to transportation troubles or the chance to capture more sleep as they juggle homework and jobs -- some want to start the school day later. However, if school districts push back start times, many parents will not be able to get their kids to school and also make it to work without being late. In addition, it would also have an effect on extracurricular activities. Many youth participate in afterschool programs, including sports. Increasingly, colleges are looking beyond academics to locate well-rounded students. Also, many students have jobs to help contribute their fair share and a later school day would cut into their hours. If we start schools later, whole families may end up suffering.
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Today, the argument continues: Which college is better, public or private? Supporters of private colleges claim they are a better investment because of prestige and job prospects. Backers of public colleges say private schools are not worth the outrageously high tuitions and can lead to a lifetime of student debt. On the private side, students are attracted to the school’s reputation with potential employers, strong alumni connections, more and varied classes, and roster of world-class professors. However, those well-known professors are often occupied with other endeavors, leaving the teaching to lesser-qualified educators. And those other lures may also turn out to be less than advertised and not worth the price In the end, the school you attend doesn’t determine who you are or who you are going to be. Having a vision of what you will do after graduation is worth more than the name of the school you attend. If you work hard, you will get a fine education and diploma. Then it’s up to you to determine what you do with all that you have learned.
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Nowadays, the use of technology is essential for learning. Teachers use email to stay in contact with students. Texts and lessons can be found online. YouTube is employed to illustrate skills. Meanwhile, students do not seem to be able to live without Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, etc. Not only are they social-media sites, but students use them to gather resources and detect any movement that society is having -- in other words, they can also be helpful for interactive educational purposes. Technology is a spectacular tool but many worry that it can also hinder true learning. For example, students can avoid reading texts and instead look up answers on the Internet. Also, spending so much time on computers or smartphones can lead to youth being disconnected from reality -- and from themselves. Technology is crucial for school use but it needs to be thoughtful so that it can facilitate efficient learning without becoming a barrier to face-to-face interaction.
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Maryan Khalif, a senior at the John D. O’Bryant School of Math & Science, prefers to do her homework while still at school when the day’s lessons are still fresh in her mind. “It just makes everything more effective,” she says. For serious students who know that their homework requirements won’t simply disappear, one of the major questions surrounding it boils down to this: do it now or do it later? As the long school day ends, some students say they need a break before hitting the books again. Others, meanwhile, feel they better get to it right away. “Homework is just one of the most boring tasks one could do,” says Natakki Jones, an O’Bryant senior, “so it’s best I finish it ASAP.” Kiana McLean, a sophomore at the O’Bryant, chooses to do her homework in a setting away from school. “It makes me more productive,” says McLean, “to focus on the task in my quiet home where distractions are limited.” This article was prepared in collaboration with 826 Boston.
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Disengaged parents are not aware of what their children are doing at school. They often don’t help their kids with homework or participate in school activities such as open houses, parentteacher conferences, and college fairs. Some argue that parental disengagement doesn’t impede a student’s progress because students have teacher support and programs that are able to help them academically. Sometimes, students have better relationships with teachers than they do with their parents. However, if mothers or fathers are not attending any school activities, they are not assuming their responsibilities as parents. Parental involvement makes school better in aspects such as activities, expectations, learning environments, and overall performances. Many parents are busy with work and raising children. Often, they are hindered by language barriers. Still, for students, it’s essential to be pushed by the person who has been with them while they’ve developed mentally and physically. The parent’s presence in a child’s classroom life not only benefits the student but also themselves, the teachers, and the school.
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