News Feed
Syrian Refugees: "To Leave Them Out to Die is Horrible"
Eighteen-year-old My Nguyen understands the need to be cautious about who the government lets into the country -- especially after the recent terrorist attacks in Paris -- but doesn’t see the need to close the doors completely to refugees fleeing the Syrian Civil War and ISIS. “We should still be careful but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t be helping,” says Nguyen, from the John D. O’Bryant School of Math & Science. “Humans are humans and they all deserve a right to be safe and have a home.” President Barack Obama has vowed to welcome some 10,000 Syrian refugees into America over the next year while many Republicans are calling for a full-on refusal. The issue took on added urgency after it was reported that one of the Paris assailants had posed as a Syrian refugee. According to a Quinnipiac University poll released last month, US voters by a 51 percent to 43 percent margin oppose accepting Syrian refugees into the country. Still, many teens say they are outraged that anyone would want to declare the US out of bounds to Syrian castaways. “There are many women and children along with them in fear of their lives -- to leave them out to die is horrible,” says Mary Flaherty, 17, from Boston Latin School. “These people are actually fleeing ISIS so for us to shut the doors on them would mean ISIS actually had won.” As for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s pledge to temporarily bar all Muslims at the border if he is elected, 17-yearold Luul Hassan, from Boston Green Academy, has a blunt response. “He’s disgusting,” says Hassan, who is a Muslim, “and the fact that people are supporting him makes me sick.” This article was prepared in collaboration with 826 Boston.
Read more…
One-hundred-thirty souls lost. In the city of love, hate has been planted. And violence sprung. Where oh where is the light? A brightness shall appear in the darkness. In the world’s eyes, the hurt will be healed. O, await that beautiful spring day. For Paris, I pray.
Read more…
The Downside of Starting School Later   School is something essential for every kid, but does that mean they shouldn’t have enough sleep? Sleep gives us the ability to concentrate in school and helps our memory and ability to learn. Lack of sleep can cause drowsiness -- a detriment both inside and outside of school. But because many teens end up arriving late to school -- either due to transportation troubles or the chance to capture more sleep as they juggle homework and jobs -- some want to start the school day later. However, if school districts push back start times, many parents will not be able to get their kids to school and also make it to work without being late. In addition, it would also have an effect on extracurricular activities. Many youth participate in afterschool programs, including sports. Increasingly, colleges are looking beyond academics to locate well-rounded students. Also, many students have jobs to help contribute their fair share and a later school day would cut into their hours. If we start schools later, whole families may end up suffering.
Read more…
Today, the argument continues: Which college is better, public or private? Supporters of private colleges claim they are a better investment because of prestige and job prospects. Backers of public colleges say private schools are not worth the outrageously high tuitions and can lead to a lifetime of student debt. On the private side, students are attracted to the school’s reputation with potential employers, strong alumni connections, more and varied classes, and roster of world-class professors. However, those well-known professors are often occupied with other endeavors, leaving the teaching to lesser-qualified educators. And those other lures may also turn out to be less than advertised and not worth the price In the end, the school you attend doesn’t determine who you are or who you are going to be. Having a vision of what you will do after graduation is worth more than the name of the school you attend. If you work hard, you will get a fine education and diploma. Then it’s up to you to determine what you do with all that you have learned.
Read more…
Nowadays, the use of technology is essential for learning. Teachers use email to stay in contact with students. Texts and lessons can be found online. YouTube is employed to illustrate skills. Meanwhile, students do not seem to be able to live without Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, etc. Not only are they social-media sites, but students use them to gather resources and detect any movement that society is having -- in other words, they can also be helpful for interactive educational purposes. Technology is a spectacular tool but many worry that it can also hinder true learning. For example, students can avoid reading texts and instead look up answers on the Internet. Also, spending so much time on computers or smartphones can lead to youth being disconnected from reality -- and from themselves. Technology is crucial for school use but it needs to be thoughtful so that it can facilitate efficient learning without becoming a barrier to face-to-face interaction.
Read more…