Why do students complain about school bathrooms being so dirty when they’re the ones messing them up? You walk into the bathroom and there are tissues and paper towels on the floor. The toilets are not flushed and it smells really bad. Not to mention the hair all over the sink. And the graffiti on the stall walls. The school does its job keeping them clean but students just continue making them filthy to the point where some don’t even want to use the bathrooms anymore. As one student said about the dirty toilets: “Do you know how to flush? It’s not that hard. Makes me wonder: ‘Do they flush at home?’”
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I’ve always wondered what it would be like if I was not graded in school. Many students feel that the grades they get at the end of a semester or an assignment is what motivates them to do their best, not the learning. There are many factors that may affect your grade. For example, what if you were really sick last year and your grade went from an A to a C? Despite the circumstances, many students are rejected from programs or not admitted to their dream schools because their grades or test scores are below what is considered good enough. This makes me think that there is some sort of injustice because you are prohibited from enrolling in higher education.
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Are we really preparing students for college? If yes, why is the rate of college graduation for many students not achieving the expected results? Research has found that some students lack an important element that could help them to stay, which is grit. Grit is a characteristic that makes it easier for students to overcome obstacles with steadiness and hard work. For some, grit can be as essential as intelligence when it comes to high achievement. We are telling kids that they can accomplish many things when we’re not always giving them the tools to be successful. Some who got into college are having trouble dealing with financial aid, having to study, and needing to work to survive. We need to prepare kids at an early age. Childhood education is very important because the more we expect them to do, the better they can perform. Teaching kids how to deal with challenges would help them to get more grit.
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Students from coalitions and youth groups all over Massachusetts recently gathered at the State House to speak to representatives about Governor Deval Patrick’s new tax plan, which will help fund crucial sectors that affect young people, such as education and transportation. A dozen youth from the Boston Student Advisory Council came out to lobby for raising revenue through fair taxation that asks the rich to pay a little more. Some students spoke about how a lot of teenagers have to go to work but don’t have the money to get on the bus. It’s ridiculous for young people to be unable to afford to take the bus when their jobs help their families pay for bills at the end of the month. BSAC shared stories about how supporting the plan will benefit schools that lack funding and people with special needs, and how it is essential to us as students.
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School
Overachievement: an overreaction?
Alex Kabengele, 19, from Community Academy of Science and Health, says that he is a big overachiever. “I won’t settle for less and I always try and do my best no matter what,” he says. “Overachieving can never be bad. To be successful, you need to overachieve.” Not so fast, says the blog dianesmusings.com. “Pushing ourselves beyond the point of exhaustion, or to the exclusion of important people in our lives, robs us of true and meaningful joy,” writes psychologist Diane Mickelson. Mimi Ha, 18, from CASH, says that she doesn’t let things bother her too much. “I do my work,” says Ha, “but I don’t let it take over my life.” Xena Joseph, a freshman at CASH, agrees that being an overachiever can be harmful. “I am definitely not an overachiever,” says Joseph. “It’s way too stressful to be thinking about school work all day, every day.”
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